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How to Find HCFCD’s Active Projects in Your Area

Ever wonder where your tax and flood-bond dollars go? Harris County Flood Control District shows all its active projects on one page. You can review those projects in tabular form or on a map. You can even click on links to learn more about each project. Or explore it in depth by going to its related “watershed” page.

Active maintenance (orange) and capital (purple) flood mitigation projects in Harris County as of 1/4/22 shown against backdrop of precinct boundaries adopted on 10/28/21. Purple = P1, Green = P2, Red = P3, Yellow = P4.

Paragon of Transparency

HCFCD’s Active Projects page is a paragon of government transparency. You can even switch out base maps to see where the projects fall in terms of the old or new precinct boundaries approved on October 28, 2021.

One side benefit of the two base maps is that they give you a clear, unambiguous view of the redistricting boundaries.

Zoom far enough in on the map and you can even see your street, home, and the drainage features around you (streams, channels, storm sewers, etc).

As of today HCFCD has 64 active projects.

  • 31 maintenance projects total $60 million
  • 33 capital projects total $232.4 million

In case you want to see how the map changes from time to time, you can even download a PDF, such as this one from December 2021. Save it for future comparison.

Monitoring Work in Progress

Physically seeing work in progress is difficult. Construction zones are dangerous and often fenced off or hidden behind trees. They’re also so large that seeing them from an entrance at ground level is almost impossible.

The good news: the projects almost always include hike and bike trails, like the one below, which you can enjoy upon completion.

Willow Water Hole
Willow Water Hole near South Post Oak and Highway 90. One part of a six compartment detention basin complex ringed by hike and bike trails.

However, if you want to monitor work in progress, your best bet is a drone.

Good News from Commissioners Court Today

Commissioner Tom Ramsey introduced a motion to affirm Commissioners’ intentions to complete all projects in the flood bond. Despite several previous attempts to cancel projects and change bond priorities, commissioners voted unanimously to complete the entire bond package. Ramsey will be the new commissioner for the Lake Houston Area if the Ellis-3 redistricting plan survives court challenges. See the sprawling red area on the map above.

Posted by Bob Rehak on 1/4/2022

1589 Days since Hurricane Harvey